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Australia condemns continuing LTTE civilian massacre and use of child soldiers 
[04 Apr 2000]
 

The Australian delegation at the ongoing United Nations Commission on Human Rights sessions in Geneva, while expressing concern about the ethnic conflict in Sri Lanka, condemned the continuing LTTE attacks on innocent civilians and their use of child soldiers. 

The delegation had also welcomed the progress made by the Sri Lankan government in investigating disappearances, like the Chemmani mass graves and the successful prosecution of security force personnel. 

"Australia remains deeply concerned by the continuing ethnic conflict in Sri Lanka and urges all parties to cease hostilities and undertake negotiations to find a lasting political solution that takes into account the legitimate aspirations of all Sri Lankans". 

Welcoming the progress made in investigating disappearances, such as the Chemmani multiple graves investigations, and the successful prosecution of members of the security forces for human rights abuses, the delegation stated that they are encouraged by the progress made by the Human Rights Commission. They also urged it to be strengthened further. 

"Australia deplores and condemns all acts of terrorism and is greatly concerned by the continuing brutal killing of innocent civilians by the LTTE and their use of child soldier". 

According to political sources, responses from the international community against brutal massacres of the LTTE has been escalating day by day even with the full swing of LTTE propaganda carried out by their activists.   

"They are propagating a wrong picture about civilian deaths and their sufferings attaching the blame to the government and the security forces in order to maintain the influx of funds to the LTTE treasury".


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