Campaign to end domestic violence against women launched

[September 24, 2004 - 10.45 GMT] 

An island-wide Campaign to End Violence Against Women (CEVAW) was launched today with the aim to reduce social acceptance of violence against women.

The objective of this three-year campaign initiated by funded by Oxfam GB is to create an enabling environment for public dialogue on violence against women and to generate a collective as well as visible stand against it, so as to bring about change in attitudes, beliefs and practices.

“The pervasive culture of domestic violence has eroded women’s fundamental rights to life, security, bodily integrity, work and safety at home. We need to take stock of this growing concern and reassess our attitudes and practices that support and condone violence against another individual. This is the responsibility of every human being, including you and me,” President Chandrika Kumaratunga said in a video message at the launch at BMICH.

In Sri Lanka, it is estimated that around 60% of women are subjected to domestic violence. According to the statistics compiled by the Sri Lanka police based on complaints it has registered during 2003, there were 2155 cases of violence against women, of which 690 cases were of battering, assault and injury.

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Violence is an inescapable reality in women’s lives, as the social customs and attitudes that support violence against them are entrenched and institutionalized at all levels, in the home, family, community, society, and the State. Breaking the silence on this violence is not easy, or is it even real option for most women, to do so would threaten their lives.

The incidence of violence against women is growing notwithstanding the immense efforts of women’s groups and other local, national and international organizations over the past three decades.

Worldwide, one in three women will face violence simply because they are female.

The situation of women in South Asia is worse. In Sri Lanka, it is estimated that around 60% of the women are subject to domestic violence. Even with such high figures domestic violence is still seen as normal and a private matter. This normalization of domestic violence reinforces societal acceptance. We need to recognize domestic violence, as a violation of human rights, and this should no longer be tolerated.

The pervasive culture of domestic violence has eroded women’s fundamental rights to life, security, bodily integrity, work and safety at home.

We need to take stock of this growing concern and reassess our attitudes and practices that support and condone violence against another individual. This is the responsibility of every human being, including you and me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Last Updated Date: September 24, 2004  - 10.45 GMT.

 


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Campaign to end domestic violence against women launched