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Friday, June 06, 2014 - 04.57 GMT

Sri Lanka to make formal objections to Jayalalithaa's genocide accusations

 

Strongly objecting to the Tamil Nadu Chief Minister, J. Jayalalithaa's allegation of 'genocide' of Tamil people during the final phase of the conflict, Sri Lanka yesterday said a formal objection will be made to the Indian government over her remark.

Addressing a media briefing yesterday at the Government Information Department, the Minister of Media and Information and Cabinet Spokesman Keheliya Rambukwella said it is "very wrong" to use words like 'genocide' to describe what happened in Sri Lanka.

"She has used the word genocide. This is very wrong. We believe that it is creating a wrong image of us in the democratic world," the Minister said.

The Chief Minister during her meeting with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Tuesday in New Delhi submitted a memorandum to the Prime Minister asking the Indian government to bring a resolution against Sri Lanka in the UN condemning the alleged genocide.

"I request that India should sponsor a resolution in the United Nations condemning the genocide in Sri Lanka and to hold to account all those responsible for the genocide and thereby render justice to Tamils in Sri Lanka," the Chief Minister said in the memorandum.

"It is very much in keeping with the character of this politician to make wild allegations against Sri Lanka," Rambukwella told reporters.

Minister Rambukwella expressed hope that Prime Minister Modi will "stand on the right side that is Sri Lanka's."

Speaking of a political solution to the Tamil issue, the Minister said certain powers vested to the provincial councils through the 13th Amendment to the Constitution should be reconsidered before being implemented.

The Minister while noting that the 13th Amendment can be implemented immediately, said problems arise when the government implements all the sections of the Amendment.

"The current government has accepted that handing over police powers proves to be an issue of national security. We are looking into the possibility of whether we can hand over at least some police powers," the Minister said pointing out that the Constitution is not something that is permanent and can be subjected to change many times.

The Sri Lankan government on Wednesday reiterated its stance that police powers will not be given to the provincial councils.

External Affairs Minister Professor G.L. Peiris speaking in parliament said Sri Lanka "made it crystal clear (to India) that devolution of police power is not acceptable."



 

 
 
   
   
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Last modified: June 11, 2014.

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