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Sunday, December 07, 2014 -  6.25 GMT
MAHINDA STANDS OUT AMIDST A PLETHORA OF PACTS

By Lucien Rajakarunanayake

 

With just two more days for nominations in the coming presidential poll, there is still much of the chaos seen in the common candidacy, despite the din heard about the finalizing of agreements. The problem here is the plethora of agreements on the common candidate, between parties and among groups, leading to what seems to be a deluge of understandings, but more of a flood of misunderstandings.

The fact remains that so far not all who are said to be backing the common candidate have come together in one place and signed a single document of agreement or understanding. The paper trail that keeps extending with some parties or groups not ready to be seen together with others who claim to support the same candidate or policy, point to an overall weakness of the strategy in facing up to a single candidate who holds office, and remains unshaken in the move to contest the coming election, and a third term in the office of Executive President.

In the midst of all this confusion that is displayed well in the media, and the attempted displays of political togetherness, that in fact show more division than unity, the race for agreements shows an overkill or superfluity on detail, and much less in the more important aspects of policy and principle. What matters most in this context is the clear division in thinking that is seen in these "agreements" reached. It is the fact that when one agreement mentions the abolition of the Executive Presidency, another agreement to support the same candidate talks only of removing the arbitrary decision making aspects of the Executive Presidency. This uncertainty is certainly a puzzle that voters will have to work out in the coming weeks.

ith just two more days for nominations in the coming presidential poll, there is still much of the chaos seen in the common candidacy, despite the din heard about the finalizing of agreements. The problem here is the plethora of agreements on the common candidate, between parties and among groups, leading to what seems to be a deluge of understandings, but more of a flood of misunderstandings.

The fact remains that so far not all who are said to be backing the common candidate have come together in one place and signed a single document of agreement or understanding. The paper trail that keeps extending with some parties or groups not ready to be seen together with others who claim to support the same candidate or policy, point to an overall weakness of the strategy in facing up to a single candidate who holds office, and remains unshaken in the move to contest the coming election, and a third term in the office of Executive President.

In the midst of all this confusion that is displayed well in the media, and the attempted displays of political togetherness, that in fact show more division than unity, the race for agreements shows an overkill or superfluity on detail, and much less in the more important aspects of policy and principle. What matters most in this context is the clear division in thinking that is seen in these "agreements" reached. It is the fact that when one agreement mentions the abolition of the Executive Presidency, another agreement to support the same candidate talks only of removing the arbitrary decision making aspects of the Executive Presidency. This uncertainty is certainly a puzzle that voters will have to work out in the coming weeks.



 

 
 
   
   
     
   
   

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Last modified: December 07, 2014.

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